Gut Dysbiosis Concerns on Keto – Q5 – Q&A 31 – Ep 438

Gut Dysbiosis Concerns on Keto – Q5 – Q&A 31 – Ep 438


let’s see okay our final question this week is from keenan gut dysbiosis concerns on quito dear Rob I appreciate very much your non dogmatic approach when it comes to tackling information regarding very low carb and keto Dietary Approaches ie who are you what are your performance needs are you sick and busted up a hard-charging athlete etc that’s why they why I feel you’re the best person to ask about this as you aren’t inherently biased it’s a very nice comment very nice compliment I have a family history of cancer depression mental illnesses addiction and adult ADHD I haven’t been diagnosed with any of these issues though I definitely deal with unevenness and mood and focus besides my interest in preventing any future health issues for which I might be at risk I found that a very low carb high fat diet just seems to suit my brain the best I’m less irritable and anxious my sex drive is fine and most importantly for me my focus and attention is just totally on point I’ve tried a multitude of eating styles but very low carb is the only one that finds me springing out of bed in the morning with the birds chirping and excitement to get to work each day I call it nature’s adderall except I don’t have any crazy stim mania the only thing holding me back from maintaining this approach is a nagging worry about the hypothetical implicit implications of long term very low carb as it pertains to GI microbiome diversity potential dysbiosis risks mucin production thyroid problems etc I’ve read as much as I can find from the experts I tend to trust in this field like a TIA and D’Agostino but have yet to find anything that definitively quells my worry of causing some sort of damage from which it might be difficult to come back do you think the long-term risks might be overblown I do take prescript assist and raw potato starches potential mitigators but I don’t know if very low carb is taking a step or two back from my gut bugs and I’m very concerned about treating them well I always suspected got problems being at the root of my late father’s alcoholism and his myriad of inflammatory problems some of these worries have prevented me from staying in keto for longer than about a month at a time every time I start phasing a larger amount of carbs back in however the a mild and annoying accompanying brain fog and up-down cycle seemingly irrelevant of the dietary source I understand that these questions get vetted and you’re busy so no worries if this one doesn’t make the cut Isis airlie appreciate everything that you and your team have done for my health and the health of my family as well as the awareness you’re raising regarding even larger political issues we’re facing sincerely Kenan awesome awesome that’s it’s nice to know that what we’re doing matters even if it’s one person now so man so I guess first out of the gate even after all that phrase I don’t think I’m gonna have a definitive answer to this and so it’s it’s a complex topic and I have to say it’s been an interesting ride for me because even though I’m have been and you know primarily known as like the paleo guy I was the paleo guy that always leaned much towards the low-carb side of things and and man I tried and tried and tried to get the kind of boy eaten Loren Cordain ratios of paleo to work and it just really didn’t work for me I didn’t feel good I had got issues brain fog seemed to be up and down and so and you know I’ve tried every iteration of the stuff and then smart people like Paul Jam and they raise these questions about ketosis being problematic long term like the loss of the mucin layer in the gut because of lack of dietary carbohydrate and then the gut bacteria would say well if you’re not gonna feed me I’m gonna eat the gut lining and you know and then you lose this kind of like effectively like a mucous layer that is the the real barrier between your body and the feces if it’s moving through it you know there’s kind of kind of mucous kind of layer there and so I try resistant starches and safe starches and man I I really gave it the old college girl and I just felt terrible on it like I I mean I tried everything and did the potato starch and if you okay for a couple of days and then it just absolutely crushed me and I think we’ve talked about a couple of times the Sonnenberg lab and they have some concerns around mono cropping your gut microbiome around like one type of fermentable carbohydrates so if you were to supplement with something dr. Perlmutter has a product through garden of garden of length that is a super diverse fiber blend it has like citrus peel and acacia root and all the stuff if I were going to do something I would probably do something like that it has kind of a broader spectrum and kind of deal but they’re the only limit is that before to like swapping it out like yeah rotating and doing the same same thing all the time yeah I think that makes some sense and again I would just kind of pressure test it for do you look feel perform better and all that type of stuff particularly when you have this baseline but feeling really really good when you’re on very low carb and then feeling significantly not good when when you’re not it is a really interesting question though you know is there some something that we’re giving up down the road for some gain that we have now and I just don’t know that anybody can answer that there are some preliminary studies that suggest that very low carb diets although they changed the gut microbiota they don’t necessarily change them in a completely like dysfunctional way there’s there’s some pluses and minuses but some of the way that the gut changes would generally be associated with like beneficial Laure but even some of the ones that are considered to be not as beneficial the researchers acknowledge that within the context of a low-carb diet it may not matter you know like things may may change in that scenario and again for most people we see improvements in blood lipids and blood glucose control not everybody across the board but but by and large we tend to see that and something that’s frequently forgotten in this story is that if you construct a low-carb diet properly like things like artichokes and avocados and asparagus and stuff like that you can get a remarkable amount of fermentable fiber and a very low glycemic load so I’ve kind of had this notion that you know try to eat your way out of ketosis using very low glycemic load carbohydrates which means that you’re just gonna be eating a ton of them you know but Keane and I appreciate the kind words and the you know kind of the faith that you have in us on on this but at the end of the day I don’t think that anybody has been able to put a definitive pin on this because I think to some degree it depends on the person depends on the circumstance I tell you it’s it’s really fascinating some of the research around say like the carnivore diet that is interesting in ketosis in general so one of the big benefits that are sold around fermentable carbohydrates is that we release like butyrate and propria Nate Melanie in the short chain saturated fats which is super cool they appear to have these great signaling properties and whatnot and and they’re ostensibly feeding some we’ve got microbiota and also the cells lining the epithelial cells and what-have-you but what’s interesting is in the state of ketosis beta-hydroxybutyrate which is just a slightly modified version of butyrate transload it translocates into the gut and it feeds the gut microbiota and epithelial cells so that’s a whole interesting thing that nobody was really considering nobody was talking about so maybe the endogenous state of ketosis is feeding the guy in a different then the real mind blower flew by me not that long ago a whole bunch of the amino acids can be fermented or converted into the short chain saturated fat and are and tend to be preferentially driven that direction in a low-carb environment so the more we scratch around this debt like the manna there was a paper that I was reading just a few days ago and it made this case that you the most important thing that you need to do like where mistakes occur in science is on the first page in the first paragraph in the assumptions if the assumptions are wrong then the whole thing goes completely sideways and this is where you know I think like this evolutionary health ancestral health Paleo diet model is incredibly powerful as a hypothesis generating tank but then we need to go out and tinker and fiddle and see what the results are and whatnot and most of the big gas most of the big mistakes that have kind of occurred there we’re an outgrowth of wrong assumptions it’s not because people are bad but because you have an idea and you you pressure test it it just doesn’t stand up to scrutiny your hypothesis ends up being false or or there’s some other nuance to it or something like that like one one thing that comes to mind is Stephan Lindbergh’s idea around dietary lectins and and they’re potentially causal role in metabolic syndrome and he has the whole Kotova study they he talks about this and it’s really beautifully done because he starts with kind of a anthropological observation people in the West have rates of diseases that are different than this kind of Aboriginal culture then he does an epidemiological study then he does a study and animals so he’s got an animal model and then he does a study in humans and the thing is very consistent and it really makes a case that these dietary lectins could be the underlying problem but then a paper came out suggested that a cellular carbohydrate refined carbohydrate is actually the driver for all of this modern Western metabolic syndrome type stuff and that fits all this story – and so the quite there was a great question asked around this but it was asked in a way that wasn’t specific enough to delineate whether lectins or the cause or whether a cellular carbohydrate was the cause or it may be a combination of both or in some people that may be lectins and and other people may be dense a cellular carbohydrate so you know where we start with assumptions is a really important piece to this whole story and again you know like I kind of sided with some folks like dr. Shaun Baker we can get so out in the weeds with like mechanisms and mTOR and all this stuff and I think it just ends up being kind of at some point if we know for a fact that if we just don’t overeat if we exercise if we sleep well if we’re generally feeling good the good things are going to happen and it’s difficult to do anything else that’s going to be any better for us you know and so that’s kind of where and maybe I’m saying all this stuff to make myself feel better because I’m in a very similar situation I tend to feel my best one if that kind of Perry ketogenic level and and I’ve tinkered with that and found that I feel even better when my protein intake is higher i’ve even kind of foregone a lot of the vegetable intake that i used to do because I noticed that my digestion was even better with with certain types and the removal of others and making sure it’s definitely cooked so really focusing on that clinical outcome of do I look feel and perform better has been my primary driver okay awesome I think that was our final question this week wheat anything else we need to tell people about I don’t think so I hope everybody’s having an awesome summer indeed indeed stay hydrated with drink element and unless your questions a troubles calm on the contact page and still I think at least for a while most of my activity on social media is gonna be over at Instagram might have some interesting developments around that that topic here in the not-too-distant future so yeah all right take care

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