(ASL) Plant-based protein diet to meet our needs

(ASL) Plant-based protein diet to meet our needs


Protein is a nutrient made of amino acids –
the building blocks for many of your body’s
structures, including muscle (not only muscle), also
including, bone, skin, and hair. They also play a role in the creation of many
substances that your body requires to go
about its everyday business of living. Some amino acids that cannot be made in
the body are termed “essential.” We must get them from the food we eat. It is
not difficult to meet your protein needs on a
vegan diet. In fact, studies show that vegans usually
meet or exceed their protein requirements. You just need to focus on including protein-
rich foods in meals and snacks throughout
the day. Most plant foods, with the exception of soy,
quinoa, and spinach, may be low in one or
two of the essential amino acids, but you can get enough of all these amino
acids by including a variety of whole plant
foods in your diet. Legumes means beans, peas, lentils and
peanuts provide an essential amino acid
called lysine but contain relatively low quantities of the
essential amino acid methionine. Grains provide an essential amino acid
called methionine, on the other hand, contain relatively low
quantities of the essential amino acid lysine. You can combine grains and legumes to
make high-quality proteins. This is why some vegetarian cultures – in
order to get a good balance of amino acids
needed for growth and repair – combine their diet of legumes with cereal
grains. Common examples of such combinations
are dhal with rice in India, beans with corn
tortillas in Mexico, tofu with rice in Asia and peanut butter with bread in the USA and
Australia. It was once thought that plant proteins
needed to be combined within a meal by
mixing grains and legumes to create a “complete” protein,
also called complementary proteins, with
good amounts of all essential amino acids. Now we know that the liver can store the
amino acids so we don’t have to combine
them in one meal. Legumes, which include beans, lentils, and
dried peas, and soy, nuts and seeds, are rich
sources of protein, but whole grains and vegetables contain
protein, too. Some whole grains, such as wheat varieties
like farro, Kamut®, and wheat berries provide
up to 11 grams of protein per cup. Even vegetables can provide protein, such as
spinach (5 grams per cup) and peas (8
grams per cup). A variety of easy-to-use meat alternatives can
be found in most supermarkets, such as veggie burgers, meatless bacon, hot dogs,
and ‘beef’ crumbles, as well as faux chicken
nuggets, sausage, and ‘beef’ strips. While these are simple solutions to meal
planning, you’re better off choosing minimally
processed plant foods that have lower levels of sodium, sugar, oils
and no artificial additives. Many plant proteins, including beans, lentils,
and soy, are naturally packed with other
beneficial nutrients like fiber, vitamins, minerals, healthy fat, and
antioxidants, and contain very little saturated
fat, sodium and cholesterol. This may be one reason why vegan diets are
linked with lower disease risk. The RDA recommends that we take in 0.8
grams of protein for every kilogram that we
weigh or about 0.36 grams of protein per pound that
we weigh. The overall daily protein recommendation
vegans for every healthy person and older
adults may benefit from amount of protein— approximately 0.8 grams per pound of body
weight. For example, if you weigh 150 pounds divide
by 2.2 equal to 68 kg, you would multiply 68 kg x 0.8=55 grams of
protein for your daily need. Or 150 pounds time by 0.36 is equal to 54
grams of protein per day. Vegan athletes, especially in the early stages
of training, may have higher protein needs
than vegans who exercise moderately or who are not
active. Vegan athletes’ protein needs can range from
0.36 to 0.86 grams of protein per pound. Protein supplements are not needed to
achieve even the highest level of protein
intake. While many people think protein can be a
challenge for vegans, it’s easier than you
think to meet your needs. Focus on choices that include plenty of whole,
minimally processed plant foods (see
Protein-rich Plant Foods) at each meal and snack, and avoid filling up
on highly processed, low-nutrient foods, such as chips, cookies and sweets, and
refined grain crackers, which can crowd out
protein in your diet. Look at image “Where do you get your
protein?” provided by VeganStreet.com “There are many excellent sources of Vegan
Protein and so very many more!” provided by
VeganStreet.com I will provide you a handout of Best Plant-
Based Source of Protein provided by No Meat
Athlete website under my vlog. If you have any question, please post your
comment or private inbox. I will post different
nutrition topic videos. Thank you for watching my vlog. See you next
time.

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